The Catholic University of America

 

“But I Thought Only Crazy People Go to the Counseling Center?”

This is a phrase often spoken by students soon after their first experience visiting the Counseling Center. A common myth about receiving counseling is that people must be really struggling or distressed to benefit from services. While the Counseling Center at CUA certainly can work well with individuals undergoing serious mental health concerns, the majority of students are functioning rather well and simply benefit from working with an unbiased professional who is able to help them better understand and address their concerns. One way to view counselors is analogous to coaches or trainers for your mental well-being. From stressors that first appear in college to those that might have occurred in the past, the Counseling Center is well-equipped with friendly, helpful, and qualified staff to assist you should you need our assistance.

 

One of the most important elements to ensure success and enjoyment of your time during your undergraduate years is having a solid support system. This includes friends (old and new), family, community members, and faith, in addition to the supportive resources provided at CUA such as Residence Life staff, Campus Ministry, professors, staff, and the Counseling Center. Sometimes it is difficult to talk about highly personal and vulnerable matters with friends, family, and others. This is a big reason why counseling is so helpful and uniquely effective as our staff has years of professional training and expertise to address your concerns and does so in a confidential environment.

 

When people think of counseling, images of older men with beards, clipboards, and couches often come to mind. This is not the case at the Counseling Center. Few of us sport facial hair and our sessions typically resemble seated conversations. A lot of students are nervous about coming to counseling for the first time and often wait until matters become too overwhelming to manage alone. A frequent observation of first-year students and others struggling to adjust to life at college is the impression that everyone else seems to have it all figured out and is thriving. While it is the case that most students do manage to adjust to college fairly quickly with little more than minor ups and downs, you might be surprised by how many students visit our services each year Last year, we saw over 13 percent of students enrolled full-time at CUA. By the conclusion of counseling services, most students describe a high degree of satisfaction with the care they received at the center and many make statements such as, “I should’ve done this even sooner” or “Everyone would benefit from counseling and should take advantage of it.”

 

As you get used to your new home, please feel free to contact the Counseling Center at (202) 319-5765, stop by and see us at 127 O’Boyle Hall, or visit our website http://counseling.cua.edu/ for more information.